Botong Isko: University Student Council elections

Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA) dominated the 2014 University Student Council (USC) elections, clinching the chair and vice chair positions and seven of the 12 council seats Thursday.

Third update: February 28, 11:35 p.m.

ALYANSA dominates 2014 USC elections; independents top councilor race

USC

By Celine Isabelle Samson and Dexter Cabalza

Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA) dominated the 2014 University Student Council (USC) elections, clinching the chair and vice chair positions and seven of the 12 council seats Thursday.

Arjay Mercado from ALYANSA won as USC chairperson with 5,145 votes. Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (STAND UP) standard bearer Erra Mae Zabat ranked second with 3,034 votes, followed by Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) bet Carla Gonzales with 1,416 votes.

Mercado broke the record of the highest number of votes earned by a chairperson, currently held by outgoing USC chair Ana Alexandra Castro who got 4,944 votes in 2013.

ALYANSA vice chairperson candidate John Paul “JP” Delas Nieves obtained 5,175 votes and bested STAND UP and KAISA candidates Neefa Macapado and Ram Tomaneng with 3,894 and 766 votes, respectively.

Independent candidate Jethro David topped the list of USC councilors, garnering 4,286 votes. Fellow independent candidate Raymond Rodis ranked second with 4,136 votes.

ALYANSA continued its reign, clinching seven councilor seats and seven college representative posts. STAND UP got three councilor seats and five college representatives in the USC.

Only four college representatives were won by last year’s dominant party KAISA. For the top posts, more abstain votes were tallied than those earned by KAISA’s standard bearers, a 180-degree turn from the party’s performance in last year’s polls.

Meanwhile, all three independent candidates running for college representative posts gained seats in the USC representatives from Arki, Law, and NCPAG.

Clerical error found, KAISA Punzalan’s councilorship to be nullified

During the announcement the USC election results last Thursday (Feb. 27), Reg Punzalan of KAISA was proclaimed as one of the newly elected USC councilors.

A correction was set to be made Friday when it was found that Punzalan’s Halalan votes had been confused with that for ALYANSA namesake Reg Rodriguez, placing Punzalan as the sixth most voted councilor. 

STAND UP’s Mench Tilendo will now be taking up the twelfth councilor seat, with Punzalan moving down to 24th out of 33 candidates.

According to Office of Student Activities (OSA) coordinator Dr. Rommel Rodriguez, the OSA immediately convened the University Student Electoral Board (USEB) to tell them about the situation. USEB then notified the concerned parties for immediate correction.

OSA is set to release the final notice on Monday, as they wait for the USEB’s signatures before the document is submitted to the chancellor.

OSA also cleared that what happened was a clerical error and was not due to the electronic voting system.

The USEB recorded a 48.07-percent voter turnout, a slight decrease from last year’s 48.4 percent.

UP Diliman had a total number of 24,188 eligible voters, including the cross-registrants fron UP Tacloban who had a 90% voter turnout, having 108 students voting from 120.

A special election was also held for graduate students, mostly from the College of Education last Saturday. A total of 184 graduate students cast their votes earlier.

Of the 24,188 voting population, only 11,626 voted on Thursday, February 27.

—–

USC Chairperson votes:
ARJAY MERCADO (ALYANSA) – 5145
Erra Zabat (STAND UP) – 3034
Carla Gonzalez (KAISA) – 1416
Abstain – 2032

USC Vice Chairperson votes:
JP DELAS NIEVES (ALYANSA) – 5175
Neefa Macapado (STAND UP) – 3894
Ram Tomaneng (KAISA) – 766
Abstain – 1791

COUNCILORS:

1. Jethro David (Independent) – 4,286
2. Raymond Rodis (Independent) – 4,136
3. V Manalo (ALYANSA) – 3,743
4. Mico Pangalangan (STAND UP) – 3,557
5. Reg Rodriguez (ALYANSA) – 3,357

Reg Punzalan(KAISA) – 3,340 The University Student Electoral Board to nullify Punzalan’s seat due to clerical error. Tilendo moves up to claim a councilor seat.

6. Tolits Tanaka (ALYANSA) – 3,185
7. Walter Tamayo (ALYANSA) – 3,003
8. Carl Santos (STAND UP) – 2,962
9. Pola Lamarca (ALYANSA) – 2,923
10. AJ Montesa (ALYANSA) – 2,779
11. Jamie Bawalan (ALYANSA) – 2,726
12. Mench Tilendo (STAND UP) – 2,462

13. Joey Loristo (STAND UP) – 2,460
14. Kath Zarate (STAND UP) – 2, 405
15. Mel Delmoro (STAND UP) – 2,294
16. Nat Malit (KAISA) – 2,288
17. Ivan Mendoza (STAND UP) – 2,171
18. Ian Bondoc (STAND UP) – 2,141
19. Flo Betancor (STAND UP) – 2,129
20. Yvonne Amper (STAND UP) – 1,990
21. Red Maines (KAISA) – 1,936
22. Jay Han Hernandez (ALYANSA) – 1,841
23. Dren Alcain (ALYANSA) – 1,771
24. Reg Punzalan (KAISA) – 1,655
25. Alexa Nacional (KAISA) – 1,619
26. Roni Tababa (STAND UP) – 1,565
27. Jas Mendoza (KAISA) – 1,511
28. Zaira Baniaga (KAISA) – 1,345
29. KM Martinez (KAISA) – 1,185
30. Mar Carlos (KAISA) – 952
31. Danj Lopez (KAISA) – 938
32. Paulo Sotto (KAISA) – 900
33. Bryan Dacanay (KAISA) – 659

Abstain – 1,235

 

COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES TO THE USC:

Asian Insitute of Tourism: Ma. Cristine Bactol, START-AIT

College of Architecture: Raphaello Alba, Independent

College of Arts and Letters: Leslie Anne Marie Corpuz, STAND UP

College of Business Administration: Raphael Aaron Letaba,ALYANSA

College of Education: Tricia Roxas, TUGON

College of Engineering: Leo Lobigan, ALYANSA and Cheryl Siy, KAISA

College of Fine Arts: Ana Patricia Non, STAND UP

College of Home Economics: Sarah Esguerra, LEAD-CHE

College of Human Kinetics: Roi Kevin Marcial, ALYANSA

College of Law: Hannah Keila Garcia, Independent

College of Mass Communication: John Benedict Opinion, STAND UP

College of Music: Gabby Tinio, CAMERATA

College of Science: Ryan Lintao, KAISA

College of Social Sciences and Philosophy: Allan Pangilinan, BUKLOD CSSP

College of Social Work and Community Development: Audrey Antoniano, STAND UP

National College of Public Administration and Governance: Mikhail Solitario, Independent

School of Economics: Franzine Foronda, ALYANSA

School of Library and Information Studies: Ann Tan, STANDUP

School of Statistics: Cris Ian Mendoza, ALYANSA

USC Voter turnout: 48.07% or 11,626 of 24,188 students

Botong Isko: University Student Council

Breakdown of votes for the 2014 USC elections

USC Chair votes:

ARJAY MERCADO (ALYANSA) – 5145

Erra Zabat (STAND UP) – 3034

Carla Gonzalez (KAISA) – 1416

Abstain – 2032

 

USC Vice Chair votes:

JP DELAS NIEVES (ALYANSA) – 5175

Neefa Macapado (STAND UP) – 3894

Ram Tomaneng (KAISA) – 766

Abstain – 1791

 

COUNCILORS:

1. Jethro David (Independent) – 4,286

2. Raymond Rodis (Independent) – 4,136

3. V Manalo (ALYANSA) – 3,743

4. Mico Pangalangan (STAND UP) – 3,557

5. Reg Rodriguez (ALYANSA) – 3,357

6. Reg Punzalan (KAISA) – 3,340

7. Tolits Tanaka (ALYANSA) – 3,185

8. Walter Tamayo (ALYANSA) – 3,003

9. Carl Santos (STAND UP) – 2,962

10. Pola Lamarca (ALYANSA) – 2,923

11. AJ Montesa (ALYANSA) – 2,779

12. Jamie Bawalan (ALYANSA) – 2,726

 

 

COLLEGE REPRESENTATIVES TO THE USC:

Asian Insitute of Tourism: Ma. Cristine Bactol, START-AIT

College of Arts and Letters: Leslie Anne Marie Corpuz, STAND UP

College of Business Administration: Raphael Aaron Letaba,ALYANSA

College of Education: Tricia Roxas, TUGON

College of Engineering: Leo Lobigan, ALYANSA and CherylSiy, KAISA

College of Fine Arts: Ana Patricia Non, STAND UP

College of Home Economics: Sarah Esguerra, LEAD-CHE

College of Human Kinetics: Roi Kevin Marcial, ALYANSA

College of Law: Hannah Keila Garcia, Independent

College of Mass Communication: John Benedict Opinion,STAND UP

College of Music: Gabby Tinio, CAMERATA

College of Science: Ryan Lintao, KAISA

College of Social Sciences and Philosophy: Allan Pangilinan, BUKLOD CSSP

College of Social Work and Community Development: Audrey Antoniano, STAND UP

National College of Public Administration and Governance: Mikhail Solitario, Independent

School of Economics: Franzine Foronda, ALYANSA

School of Library and Information Studies: Ann Tan, STAND UP

School of Statistics: Cris Ian Mendoza, ALYANSA  

 

USC Voter turnout: 48.07% or 11,626 of 24,188 votes

 from Celine Isabelle Samson, Dexter Cabalza and Melissa Luz Lopez

University issues heat up mudslinging debate

Candidates eyeing University Student Council (USC) posts from the three major political parties traded viewpoints Friday on timely university issues in an annual UP mudslinging debate.

by Pathricia Ann Roxas

Candidates eyeing University Student Council (USC) posts from the three major political parties traded viewpoints Friday on timely university issues in an annual UP mudslinging debate.

Shifting views

Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (STAND UP) councilor candidate Joey Loristo expressed his party’s defiance against the academic calendar shift from June-August to March-May, which was approved by the Board of Regents (BOR) for all UP campuses except Diliman last February 6.

However, he clarified that they are not against internationalization, which is one of the goals of the shift.

“We don’t internationalize and become good. We become good first before we internationalize,” Loristo said.

Citing other problems the UP administration should prioritize first, Red Maines, running as councilor under Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA), did not directly junk the idea of the shift.

Dito sa ating unibersidad, hindi pa nga natin nabibigyang-solusyon ang sapat na pasilidad. Bakit hindi muna tayo mag-invest sa ating bansa, bakit hindi muna natin ayusin internally at saka na lamang natin pag-usapan ang tungkol dito [sa shift] (Here in UP, we have yet to provide adequate facilities. Why don’t we invest in our country first before talking about [the shift]),”said Maines.

Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA) chairperson candidate Arjay Mercado said that while he acknowledges its potential downfalls such as the rescheduling of board exams, the shift could also open opportunities for UP students. Mercado questioned the negative stance against the shift.

“[N]agtataka tayo na while gusto natin ng equal access to education ay sarado tayo sa posilbilidad na ito (We wonder why there is an opposition to the shift while we want equal access to education),” said Mercado.

He also said that their party sees the need for foreign exchange programs to cater to the needs of students.

Loristo contested Mercado’s statement: “Ibig bang sabihin nito ay wala nang tiwala ang students na dito nila makukuha sa UP yung mga opportunities na kailangan nila? (Does this mean that students no longer believe that they can find the opportunities they need in UP?).”

To which Mercado responded: “Hindi ibig sabihin nito na walang tiwala. We just want to broaden yung opportunities ng mga estudyante (This does not mean a lack of trust from the students. We just want to broaden the opportunities of the students).”

Resurfacing STS

The three parties voiced out their differing stands on the Socialized Tuition System (STS), previously approved by the BOR in December to replace the Socialized Tuition and Financial Assistance Program, a six-tier bracketing system which determines tuition rates based on family incomes of students.

Under the STS, there will be 30-percent increase in income cut-offs for brackets A to D while retaining income bases for brackets E1 and E2.

KAISA councilor candidate Zaira Baniaga said her party is against STS. Baniaga also cited Six Will Fix, their banner program, which calls for the allocation of six percent of the gross national product to the education sector.

Kami po sa KAISA ay naniniwala sa right to education. At hindi kami tulad ng iba na puro oppose at walang propose (We in KAISA believe in the right to education. We are not like others who just oppose without proposing solutions),” said Baniaga.

Loristo negated the accusation and said that STAND UP also proposes solutions instead of mere opposition to STS.

KAISA supporters yelled when Loristo claimed that the Six Will Fix campaign was even piloted by STAND UP in the first place.

ALYANSA’ s councilor candidate Walter Tamayo said ALYANSA supports STFAP reforms.

Nakakalungkot na yung ibang kandidato dyan puro scrap ang gusto, [samantalang] pwede naman nating ayusin (It is unfortunate that some candidates want the STS scrapped when it could be fixed)”, he added.

After a wild shout from the crowd, Loristo countered with a metaphor: “Maihahalintulad po natin ito sa kamatis na may uod. Paano mo [pa] mapipigilan ang pagkabulok kung patuloy mo itong aayusin? (STS is like a tomato that has been eaten by a worm. How can you stop it from further decay of you try to fix it continuously?).”

Tuition fee rollback?

A member of the mob asked about the possibility of a tuition rollback to retain UP’s image as the state university. While all parties claimed to have diverse stands on the tuition scheme issue, both STAND UP and KAISA agreed on the prospect of tuition fee rollback and to have a flat-rate tuition.

STAND UP’s vice chairperson candidate Neefa Macapado said, “Ang kailangan natin ay mas mababang tuition para mas maraming kabataan ang maka-access ng UP education (What we need is a low tuition in order to make UP education more accesible).”

ALYANSA also agreed to the rollback but opposed the idea of a flat-rate tuition, saying that it is better to have a tuition scheme based on a student’s financial capacity.

On accountability

Concluding the queries from the mob was the issue on the impeachment trial of incumbent councilor Christian Lemuel “Lem” Magaling. He incurred 6.5 demerits after several unexcused absences from USC general assemblies and from other violations to the USC house rules.

Last year, Magaling ran under the STAND UP slate and ranked third in the 2013 USC elections.

STAND UP accused other councilors of “sensationalizing” the issue.

Mercado specified that the issue should not be taken for granted because it was an issue of “accountability,” and it “reflects the kind of leaders we have.”

Loristo denied Mercado’s statement and said that the trial is “unconstitutional” since a simple text stood as the sole basis of being excused or unexcused. He added that Magaling performed his responsibilities in the council as head of the Education and Research Committee.

This year’s mudslinging, dubbed as Bukas Luluhod ang mga Tala, is sponsored by the UP Systemwide Alliance of Student Publications and Writers’ Organizations (Solidaridad).

(Tinig ng Plaridel is part of the UP Solidaridad alliance. –Ed.)

INQUIRY: 2014 USC Candidates

Get to know the standard bearers from UP’s three political parties who are aspiring top positions in the 2014-2015 University Student Council (USC).

Compiled by Dexter Cabalza and Celine Isabelle Samson

Photos from Kharina Mostrales and Raiza JavierUSC 2014

This article was earlier published in Botong Isko 2014, Tinig ng Plaridel’s special election primer. Read it here.

USC ‘incumbent wars’ ignite Hot Off the Grill

Incumbent councilors of the University Student Council (USC) criticized Friday the lack of unity among its members in Hot Off the Grill, the official miting de avance of the College of Mass Communication, when asked what happened to the “One Strong UP” catchphrase of the yellow-led outgoing council.

By Maria Feona Imperial

Second update: Feb. 22, 12:54 am

It was another war between the incumbent student council members – except that this time, it was open for public viewing.

Incumbent councilors of the University Student Council (USC) criticized Thursday the lack of unity among its members in Hot Off the Grill, the official miting de avance of the College of Mass Communication, when asked what happened to the “One Strong UP” catchphrase of the yellow-led outgoing council.

Carla Gonzalez, Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) candidate for chairperson, said among the problems the USC faced in forwarding pertinent issues is the tendency of its members to prioritize their own interests.

Hindi kami nagkakaroon ng consensus, laging divide the house. Paikot-ikot lang yung arguments sa USC kasi ayaw magpatalo ng iba (We do not have consensus. It is always, ‘divide the house.’ The arguments are not resolved in USC because the others do not want to give way),” Gonzalez said.

Meanwhile, UP Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA) standard bearers Arjay Mercado and JP de las Nieves pointed out how attendance, including instances of walkouts during meetings, had been a major problem.

Tension built up further when Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (STAND UP) candidate for chairperson Erra Zabat reacted, “I can give you names of council members na umaattend ng GA [na] tulog, umattend ng GA na tahimik (who attend the GA then sleeps or do not talk). And you’re all for students’ rights, you’re all for people’s struggle?”

De Las Nieves said after USC Education and Research Committee Head Christian Lemuel “Lem” Magaling’s impeachment trial in September, no general assembly (GA) pushed through since due to the lack of quorum.

Magaling was suspended and put into trial after incurring a total of 6.5 demerit points due to unexcused absences, tardiness and the unauthorized release of publicity materials, among others. After five trial sessions, charges were dropped and he was reinstated as USC councilor.

The incumbents also debated on the constitutionality of the USC demerit system. Asked whether Magaling’s trial was overpublicized compared to the resignation of Secretary-General Rafael Fernando, Gonzalez said there were no contentions from all council members at the onset of the drafting of the USC house rules.

“Palaging sinasabi na nagsasayang ng oras yung USC sa pag expose ng issue na ito. (People always say that USC wasted time when it exposed this issue.) When in fact, it’s actually an issue of accountability; it is an issue of transparency,” Mercado said.

Macapado however said the demerit system is a “fraud,” citing lapses in the specificity and strictness on the grounds of what can be considered an excused absence, including organization events outside the USC.

Meanwhile, ALYANSA’s De Las Nieves said being excused from assemblies took as simple as attending GAs or sending valid excuses via text message. He said more pressing issues, such as the UP budget and the pork barrel scam, were not tackled because USC lingered on the technicalities of Magaling’s case.

STAND UP’s Zabat, however, said some members of the USC chose to prioritize the Magaling’s impeachment case over issues such as supporting Yolanda survivors from UP Tacloban.

The event organized by the UP Mass Communicators’ Organization (UP MCO) also saw the candidates debate on issues within and outside the campus such as the San Roque demolition, UP Professional Schools, Cybercrime Law and the University Freshman Council (UFC), among others.

(This article was earlier published in Botong Isko 2014, Tinig ng Plaridel’s special election primer. Read it here.) 

Blue, red and yellow: Parties defend political orientations

From top to bottom: ALYANSA, KAISA and STAND-UP. Photos by Michelle Angelica Soriano
By Jhesset Trina EnanoWith the upcoming elections, the clash between the political parties for the University Student Council elections is brought to the very basics of their campaign – their political orientations.

In the midst of heated discussions regarding pertinent issues that ranged from candidates’ credentials to the education budget, the word war during “Kung Aagawin Mo Ang Langit,” the annual mudslinging debate in UP, was reduced yesterday to questions regarding the political stances of Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA), Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) and Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (STAND UP).

ALYANSA maintained their stand on “progressive multi-perspective activism,” which recognizes the different views on an issue and the various forms of action in the need to empower the oppressed sectors in society.

“Meron tayong lipunan na mayroong sistema na mayroong pagkakaiba-iba (We have a society with a system of differences) and this is where we draw our multi-perspectivity from,” answered candidate for councilor Jose Emmanuel Micael Eva VIII, mentioning the need to listen to different sectors.

On the other hand, “inclusive activism” is the orientation of KAISA, according to its standard bearer Shaina Santiago, which she said recognizes the various perspectives in society. However, at the end of the day, she stated that their party believes in collective action.

“We consider na tayong mga estudyante ay may magagawa; tayo ay may magagawang solusyon (We consider that we students can do something, that we can offer solutions),” she said, adding their belief in an action dubbed as “expose, oppose, propose” in which students do not merely oppose the government, but also propose solutions for the problems faced by society.

STAND UP candidate for vice chairperson Soraya Escandor, however, questioned the existence of various brands of activism.

“Ang activism po ay way of life ‘yan!” Escandor claims, eliciting applause from their supporters.

STAND UP espouses militant activism, which recognizes collective action and student demonstrations to address the problems of society. The party also recognizes that the issues of students are not separated from the issues of other basic sectors of society such as workers and farmers, according to Escandor.

“Kung Aagawin Mo Ang Langit” is organized by the UP Solidaridad System-wide Alliance of Student Publications and Writers’ Organizations. On its fourth year, it continues to present itself as a venue for candidates to show their stand on issues and answer questions from the student body.

On the course of the debate, the “multi-perspective” stance of ALYANSA was repeatedly lashed by the two other parties, for alleged inconsistency of the party with regards to its stand on issues such as the Tuition and Other Fee Increase (TOFI) and the Socialized Tuition and Financial Assistance Program (STFAP), citing reports from the Philippine Collegian, the official publication of UP Diliman.

Despite these allegations, ALYANSA said that they were misquoted by the Collegian on these reports. However, KAISA candidate for vice-chairperson Alex Castro and Escandor were united in disproving ALYANSA’s statement.

The three parties also set their differences aside and united regarding the statement made by an incumbent USC councilor regarding the independent candidate running for chairperson, Martin Loon.

In a Facebook note, Cathy Alcantara revealed the poor track record of Loon in terms of attendance in general assemblies, as well as his performance during events held by the USC. When she asked the three parties whether they believe her statement, all candidates stood up and answered a unanimous ‘yes’.

Loon failed to show up during the entire debate. In a text message to Tinig ng Plaridel, he said that his absence was due to having pneumonia earlier in the day. He said that he cannot stay under the heat of the sun and simply stayed inside buildings for the day.

OSA reveals USC candidates

By Melissa Lopez

[UPDATE] The Office of Student Affairs (OSA) released on Monday the official list of candidates for the 2012 University Student Council elections.

The Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (STAND UP) has fielded current councilors Amancio Melad III and Soraya Escandor as their running Chairperson and Vice-Chairperson.

The Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral para sa Panlipunang Katwiran (ALYANSA) has Gabriel Diño and Ace Ligsay as their top two contenders while the KAISA – Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) has  Maria Shaina Santiago and Ana Alexandria Castro as their standard bearers for the top two positions.

Incumbent STAND UP councilor Jose Martin Loon of the Sigma Rho fraternity is running as independent.

Meanwhile, the University Student Electoral Board  rejected the candidacies of Hanna Keila “Kei” Garcia and  Jeff David “Jeff” Agudelo as STAND UP councilors, Percival “PJ” Tolentino as ALYANSA councilor, and Jimson “Jimson”  Sulit as ALYANSA College of Engineering representative.

 

Chairperson

(ALYANSA) Diño, Gabriel “Heart”
(Independent) Loon, Jose Martin
(KAISA) Santiago, Maria Shaina
(STAND UP) Melad, Amancio III “Aman”

Vice-chairperson

(ALYANSA) Ligsay, Ace “Ace”
(KAISA) Castro, Ana Alexandra
(STAND UP) Escandor, Soraya Elisse “Aya”

Councilors

ALYANSA
Ayala, Eduard Francis “Lucho”
Bautista, Patricia Isabel “Trisha”
Bringas, Patrick “Pat”
Espinosa, Maria Anna “Maan”
Eva VIII, Jose Emmanuel Micael “Mickey”
Ferrer, Gene Angelo “Gene”
Hernandez, Maria Larissa “Lars”
Rapallo, Genesis “Revee”
Santos, Alexandra Maria Francia “Alex”
Tan, Bea Helene “Bea”
Vicencio, Solomon “Sol”

KAISA
Quinito, Allyssa Joy
Reyes, Carl Anthony
Zipagan, Carla Janine
Clement, Carlos Enrico
Siy, Cheryl
Yutan, Fercival
Villareal, Jermaine
Guiang, Julliano Fernando
Punzalan, Ma. Regina
Bellosillo, Mary Grace
Mendoza, Sarah Louise
Tiu, Simon Stephenson

STAND UP
Abarro, Ghizelle Jane “Ghizelle”
Buergo, Therese Anjelica “Therese”
Canacan, Aryanna “Yanna”
Fungo, John Emmanuel “Fungo”
Guiang, Francisco Jayme Paolo “Jio”
Paris, Garret “Garret”
Roque, Rafael Natal “Raf”
Salvador, Gillian “Gillian”
Salazar, Narcisse Dominique “Nikki”
Solis, Jose Miguel “Mijo”

College Representatives

ALYANSA
Cruz, Jonas Miguelito “Jonas” (CBA)
Macabuhay, Nico “Nico” (FA)
Reyes, Ma. Christina “Tina” (Law)
Poblador, Patricia Erika “Pats” (Cmusic)
Hitosis, Maria Erica “Erica” (CS)
Crescini, Joeric Emil “Joeric” (CSSP)
Magsambol, Darrell John “Darrell” (Econ)
Omega, Christopher “Chris” (Educ)
Villejo, Stephen Jun “Poks” (Stat)
Ang, Sara Gracheooe “Grace” (CSWCD)

INDEPENDENT
Sulit, Leor Jyle (CMC)
Alicer, Nicole Ma. Nimfa (NCPAG)

KAISA
Erro, Erika Mary (AIT)
Gonzalez, Carla Monica (CHE)
Grey, Gayle Krystle (CHK)
Bondad, Serene Ezra (CS)
Obcena, Ma. Beatriz (CSWCD)
Palino, Justin Alfred (Eng’g)
Vicenta, John Karl (Eng’g)
Go, Sara Zemirah (FA)
Santos, Ihna Alyssa Marie (NCPAG)
Ibañez, Allan Michael (Stat)

STAND UP
Paredes, Peter Dominique “Peter” (Archi)
Gabral, Eduardo “Eds” (CAL)
Lucero, John Nelvin “Vino” (BA)
Isidro, Celine Alexis “Celine” (Educ)
Gloria, Enrico “Miko” (Econ)
Cajilig, Alieto Jr. “JR” (Eng’g)
Gonzales, Rejiel “Rage” (Eng’g)
Garvida, Patricia Monica “Pat” (FA)
Pagatpatan, Leonard “Leonard” (CHE)
Cruz, Roscelle “Roscelle” (SLIS)
Torres, Sarah Isabelle “Sarah” (CMC)
Del Castillo, Felipe “Felipe” (CS)
Sicat, Patrick John “Sicat” (CSSP)
Tagala, Mark Joseph “Marky” (CSWCD)

 

This article was edited on Jan. 31 to reflect the current changes in candidates. 

3 parties divide USC in election of firsts

In results from the quickest election count in UP history, Titus Tan of Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) won chairperson of the 2009 University Student Council (USC) on Feb. 25, the first time for the yellow party since it was founded in 2005.

By Andrew Jonathan Bagaoisan
Tinig ng Plaridel / UPJourn.net

In results from the quickest election count in UP history, Titus Tan of Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) won chairperson of the 2009 University Student Council (USC) on Feb. 25, the first time for the yellow party since it was founded in 2005.

The 2009 election, when all voting in UP Diliman was uniformly done and counted electronically for the first time, gave KAISA 11 seats in the 34-member council, along with Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (Stand-UP). Nine seats went to the Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral Para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA), while three went to independent candidates. (see updated USC elections 2009 results)

Tan scored a more than 1,500-vote lead over Airah Cadiogan of Stand-UP, to whom he lost last year in a tight race for USC vice chair. Tan got 4,900 votes while Cadiogan won 3,389. Niña Marie Angela Acasio of ALYANSA meanwhile gained 1,276 votes.

Stand-UP’s Jaqueline Joy Eroles won USC vice chair over Joseph Miguel Gutierrez of ALYANSA with a 614-vote difference. Both are councilors in the outgoing council.

Tan, the first candidate from KAISA to win a councilor seat in 2006, is also joined in the incoming USC by three councilors from KAISA. They won the last of the 12 councilor seats and gave their party its first councilor posts since Tan first won.

An independent candidate, Christopher Mariano “Kester” Yu, meanwhile became the number one councilor after running on an environment-focused platform. In at least four years, it was also the first time an independent snagged the most votes among councilors.

Stand-UP and ALYANSA shared four councilor seats each. The other independent, Arnie “Bong” Arquiza, landed 24th place among the 35 candidates.

Tan and Yu both come from the College of Science, where they succeeded each other as college student council chairpersons.


All goes electronic

This year’s vote also put to its first large-scale test an electronic voting system that for the first time connected computers in precincts all over UP Diliman.

Students this year had a chance to vote by merely registering at the precinct, logging online with their student numbers and generated passwords, selecting their favored candidates, and confirming their votes with a mouse click.

Voter turnout this year dipped almost three points from last year, with 10,024 students or 42.96 percent of the total voting population of 23,333. The 2008 elections registered a 45.91 percent turnout.

Members of the technical team from the UP Linux Users Group (UnPLUG) stationed across the precincts to assist students and facilitate the voting.

UnPLUG developed the open-source software used for the elections, which has been used in dormitory council elections for some years and at five UP buildings in last year’s elections.

Votes cast from all colleges were monitored and counted by a central server in the Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute. After 7 p.m., the team at the server had to wait for all precincts to finish before it could close the system and start counting, members said.

All precincts finally closed around 7:30 p.m. Less than a minute after, the total results were available for viewing in each precinct.

Last year, election watchers had to hold vigil in Vinzons Hall until early morning as the results came in from each college, the larger or farther ones often near the end.

Despite technical setbacks on election morning, the election turned out “successful,” as described by Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Elizabeth Enriquez to the Philippine Collegian.

Six students in various colleges were reported by the Collegian to have voted manually. Other students’ names also did not show up in the database.

A number could not vote at once due to problems logging in. Usually these were caused by mistyping the passwords given to them, said UnPLUG members. For instance, the students often mistake the small letter L for the number 1.

UnPLUG told TNP/UPJourn.net it hopes to release the breakdown of votes this week.

Tan: Zoo example of ‘productive’ UP assets’ use

If building call centers and commercial centers on UP’s unused land is commercialization, how about building a zoo?

ALYANSA's Titus Tan arrives at the College of Mass Communication to attend the mudslinging last Feb. 20. Photo by Roehl Nino Bautista.
Titus Tan of KAISA arrives at the College of Mass Communication for an informal debate for USC candidates.

By Rachel Miranda and Katrina Alba
Tinig ng Plaridel / UPJourn.net

If building call centers and commercial centers on UP’s unused land is commercialization, how about building a zoo?

Titus Tan, Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) candidate for University Student Council (USC) chairperson, gave this as an instance of a “productive” use for UP’s idle assets when asked for alternatives to tuition and other fees increase (TFI) at a USC mudslinging event last Feb. 20 at Palma Hall. Continue reading “Tan: Zoo example of ‘productive’ UP assets’ use”

USC Mudslinging Videos – Parts 3 to 7

Here are parts three to seven of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at Palma Hall 400 from 11 am to 2 pm. The event was entitled “Babangon Ako’t Dudurugin Kita” and was organized by the Philippine Collegian and UP Solidaridad.

Here are parts three to seven of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at Palma Hall 400 from 11 am to 2 pm. The event was entitled “Babangon Ako’t Dudurugin Kita” and was organized by the Philippine Collegian and UP Solidaridad. Continue reading “USC Mudslinging Videos – Parts 3 to 7”

USC Mudslinging Video – Part 2

Second part of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at PH 400. Question # 2: “Sa panahon ng krisis pang-ekonomiya, malabo nang makakuha ang unibersidad ng mas mataas na pondo mula sa gobyerno. May alternatibo pa ba sa tuition and other fees increase (TFI)?”

Second part of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at PH 400. The event, entitled “Babangon Ako’t Dudurugin Kita,” was organized by the Philippine Collegian and UP Solidaridad. Continue reading “USC Mudslinging Video – Part 2”

USC Mudslinging Video – Part 1

First part of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at Palma Hall 400 from 11 am to 2 pm. The event, entitled “Babangon Ako’t Dudurugin Kita,” was organized by the Philippine Collegian and UP Solidaridad.

First part of the UP Diliman University Student Council Mudslinging (Debate) held on February 20, 2008 at Palma Hall 400 from 11 am to 2 pm. The event, entitled “Babangon Ako’t Dudurugin Kita,” was organized by the Philippine Collegian and UP Solidaridad. Continue reading “USC Mudslinging Video – Part 1”