Kidlat Tahimik to receive 2009 UP Gawad Plaridel

Independent filmmaker Kidlat Tahimik is this year’s recipient of the highest award given by the University of the Philippines (UP) to a media practitioner.

Independent filmmaker Eric de Guia, better known as Kidlat Tahimik, will be conferred on July 10 with the UP Gawad Plaridel, the highest honor awarded by the university to a media practitioner.

Aside from Tahimik’s non-commercial contributions to the local cinema, the multi-awarded filmmaker was selected for introducing Philippine independent films to an international audience, according to a statement by the College of Mass Communication (CMC) Office of Extension and External Relations.

Best known for his 1977 film Mabangong Bangungot (Perfumed Nightmare) which won the Berlin Film Festival international film critics prize, Tahimik inspired local filmmakers to listen to their “inner dwarf”, the statement added.

Named after La Solidaridad editor Marcelo del Pilar’s nom de plume, the CMC-established award annually honors Philippine media practitioners “whose professional integrity and commitment to public service are reflected in his or her exemplary achievements in print, film, radio, television or the new media.”

Tahimik is 6th to join the ranks of previous UP Gawad Plaridel recipients: Eugenia Duran-Apostol for print journalism in 2004, Vilma Santos for film in 2005, the late Fidela “Tiya Dely” Magpayo for radio in 2006, Cecilia “Che-che” Lazaro for television in 2007, and Pachico A. Seares for community journalism in 2008.

Tahimik will receive the Gawad Plaridel, sculpted by National Artist Napoleon Abueva, on July 10, 2 pm at the UP Film Institute. He will then lecture on independent filmmaking.

Diliman kicks off foundation with pay upgrade, museum

By Jenin Velasquez

Despite the gloomy weather, the university administration found reason to commemorate its 101st foundation on June 18 with the approval of the Salary Standardization Law III and the inauguration of heritage museum Bulwagan ng Dangal.

National Artist Virgilio Almario (left) and UP Diliman Chancellor Sergio Cao pose with busts of heroes inside the newly opened Bulwagan ng Dangal. Photo by Jenin Velasquez
National Artist Virgilio Almario (left) and UP Diliman Chancellor Sergio Cao pose with busts of heroes inside the newly opened Bulwagan ng Dangal. Photo by Jenin Velasquez

Salary Standardization Law III

After opening the system-wide anniversary with a flag-raising ceremony in Quezon Hall, Diliman campus chancellor Sergio Cao announced the inclusion of UP teachers to the recently-approved Salary Standardization Law III.

Signed by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on June 17, the Salary Standardization Law III, or Congressional Joint Resolution Number 4, sought to “upgrade the public elementary and secondary school teachers as well as government nurses´ positions in recognition of their technical and intellectual demands of their work,” according to the Office of the President website.

The joint resolution also sought to modify the weaknesses in the compensation and position classification system of the government, as well as its uniformed personnel’s base salary.

Cao said president Emerlinda Roman pushed for the inclusion of UP teachers in the executive order, which will increase salaries by an average of 50 percent over the next four years.

“Perhaps, this salary increase due to SSL III will not be as great as we hoped, but it is nice to think that little by little our dream for a higher income will be fulfilled,” Cao said.

In an interview with Tinig ng Plaridel, Cao mentioned his plans for the improvement of the campus, “Regarding physical infrastructure, we’re fixing the roads and the traffic aside from repainting the buildings last year to make it look better. There’s also the aspect of faculty and staff development, where in the next few years, we’re fixing the incentives, professorial chairs, and research grants.”

The chancellor added that there were planned projects for four student dormitories along Jacinto St. and a new dorm in Kalayaan Residence Hall.

Bulwagan ng Dangal

Ending the day’s celebrations was the inauguration of the university heritage museum, Bulwagan ng Dangal, with the inclusion of works from eight National Artists for the Visual Arts.

Taking its name from a line in the university hymn, the museum presented selected pieces from the University Art Collection, which counted more than 1,000 works scattered over the seven constituent campuses of the UP System.

The opening exhibition entitled, “Pag-asa ng Bayan” featured a collection by National Artists Napoleon Abueva, Fernando Amorsolo, Benedicto Cabrera, Abdulmari Asia Imao, José Joya, Vicente Manansala and Hernando Ocampo, and other UP alumni-artists.

“The current exhibition underscores the rich base where the University Art Collection stands when viewed according to certain determinants, breathing into the collection a sense of the expansive where aesthetic forms and content are brought to fore,” according to project co-curator Rubén Defeo in the exhibit´s accompanying brochure.

Modified acad requirement for org recognition proposed by orgs, profs

By Ernica de Guzman

The Faculty-Student Relations Committee (FSRC) proposed June 16 to drop the “no grade of 4.0” rule for officers among other changes to the annually-amended Guidelines for College of Mass Communication-based student organizations.

The committee decided to remove the guideline provision that an officer “should not have incurred a grade of 4.0 in the previous semester” after 10 out of the 12 CMC-recognized organizations voted against the College Executive Board (CEB) definition of “good academic standing,” which meant not acquiring a grade 4.0 or 5.0.

Representatives from 16 student organizations reasoned out that 4.0 is “not failing” and can still be removed to get a grade of 3.0, which is a passing grade according to university rules.

UP Journalism Club president John Antiquerra also proposed to decrease the required minimum number of members from 15 to 10. He reasoned out that some organizations have a lot of officers because of specialized committees.

None of the organizations objected to this suggestion. FSRC included it in the proposed amendments to be submitted to the CEB.

Additions to the guidelines

Also raised was a proposal to add a provision saying that the CEB can deliberate the number of organizations that can apply for recognition, and not just based on the “per department” counting.

Currently, the guidelines state that there can only be “two per department, or eight department-based organizations” and “six inter-departmental organizations”.

Former CMC chairperson Marian Santos, who attended the meeting as a representative from the Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights-UP (STAND-UP), referred to the case last year when three film organizations were granted college recognition.

Santos said that since the maximum number of organizations that the college can recognize was not reached then, an additional organization that was based in film was allowed to be approved.

The guidelines state that the maximum number of organizations that the college can grant recognition is 16, including the Student Council and graduate Students’ Association.

Until recognition, organizations are not allowed benefits such as availing locker space, free use of the college auditorium for four hours each semester, and holding events, either by the college which they are based, or the university.

The FSRC committee was composed of one faculty member from the Broadcast Communication, Journalism, Communication Research, and Film departments, student council chairperson Rupert Mangilit, the graduate studies association chairperson, student organization representatives and the college secretary Lourdes Portus.

The proposed amendments will be deliberated by the CEB. Their final decision will be released on June 22. Deadline for college recognition is on July 7, 5pm.

Huts as substitute for tambayans –CMC college sec

By Ernica de Guzman

College of Mass Communication (CMC) secretary Lourdes Portus suggested Tuesday the purchase of seven “kubo” (huts) as temporary substitute for tambayans during the first Faculty-Student Relations Committee (FSRC) meeting.

Portus, also the chair of the FSRC, said that the administration would try to purchase the huts to address the continuing plea of the student organizations for tambayans. She also mentioned that they get complaints from professors about students blocking passageways in CMC such as the staircases and corridors.

Estimated at P30,000, one hut can accommodate two organizations, the college secretary said. Portus suggested that the council and organizations raise funds for the purchase of more huts if the seven that the administration is willing to provide will not suffice.

Some student organization representatives said the administration could just add the money for the huts to the money needed for the construction of the permanent structure of the tambayans. But Portus replied that even if the money for the huts is added to the existing capital for tambayan construction, the amount needed to build the tambayan complex is still inadequate.

CMC chairperson Rupert Mangilit said he still prefer a more permanent structure or the tambayan complex for the organizations. For the meantime, if the organizations clamor for a place to stay for comfort’s sake, he is willing to push through with the proposal.

“What’s important is that the students have their own space,” said Mangilit in an interview with Tinig Ng Plaridel. “Now if they still need additional units, maybe we could work together to lobby for it.”

He also said that communication with the college administration regarding the construction of tambayans, such as asking for updates, would still be continued.

“Let’s not allow them to be complacent that just because they provided [organizations] with huts, they wouldn’t push through with the plan of the [Office of the Campus Architect]. First, there’s already a plan. Second, there’s already funding so what’s their excuse not to do it?” said Mangilit.

He added that in the event the huts are no longer needed in lieu of the permanent tambayans, spaces in the complex can be given to recognized organizations while the huts can be used by students and unrecognized organizations.

Mangilit said that he will discuss these matters with CMC Dean Roland Tolentino on the 22nd or 23rd.

Room M201, the former tambayan complex was transformed into a classroom in 2007. Moreover, the tambayans in the building between CMC and Media Center were also deconstructed in 2007. A room in this building is now the student council office and another room is allotted for the lockers of the organizations.

UP groups call for student, media protests against Con-ass

Members of the University of the Philippines (UP) community on Wednesday encouraged their ranks to join the protests and show a united stand against charter change, eight days after the House of Representatives approved House Resolution 1109.

By Ernica de Guzman and Edmark San Antonio

Members of the University of the Philippines (UP) community on Wednesday encouraged their ranks to join the protests and show a united stand against charter change, eight days after the House of Representatives approved House Resolution 1109.

Photo by Roehl Nino Bautista
Photo by Roehl Nino Bautista

Student organizations, faculty members, workers and residents of UP convened in a press conference held at Quezon Hall to object the approval of HR 1109, or the measure seeking to convene Congress into a constituent assembly (Con-ass) to amend the 1987 constitution.

In a statement, U.P. Community Against Cha-Cha & Gloria (UPAC Gloria) said the move to form a Con-ass is an attempt to “manipulate the constituent to advance the personal political agenda of the President and her minions.”

“It’s really a national concern that affects all sectors so we’re trying to enjoin everyone to participate,” said University Student Council ( USC ) chairperson Titus Tan to Tinig ng Plaridel.

Tan said it is important to invest in an information drive to attract the attention and consciousness of the students. The council is currently tapping the possibilities of spreading information online via their own renovated website and social networking websites such as Multiply.

College of Mass Communication ( CMC ) chairperson Rupert Mangilit said that the council will use college assemblies to formally address the issue and encourage students to join the walk-out on July 10.

“Most students are just looking for a venue [to voice their opinion on issues],” Mangilit said.

Meanwhile, newly-elected Student Regent Charisse Banez said, “Calling for mass action is we’re doing as student-leaders. We’re also ensuring the increase of our numbers in preparation of the SONA [State of the Nation Address] on July 27.”

Members of the UP community march from Quezon Hall where they held a program in defiance of HR 1109 - Photo by Roehl Nino Bautista
Members of the UP community march from Quezon Hall where they held a program in defiance of HR 1109 - Photo by Roehl Nino Bautista

She also asked for the support of student organizations, dormers and college councils to participate in educational discussions on the issue.

The press conference was only the beginning of the series of demonstrations to show UP’s opposition on charter change, Banez said. The protesters later joined other groups in Makati in objection to HR 1109.

Various political groups denounced the resolution as a plot to extend President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s nine years in office beyond May 2010.

Although HR 1109 stated and “resolved with finality” that the terms of the incumbent president, vice-president, senators, congressmen, and other elected officials will not be extended.

Cha-cha’s impact on media

The ownership of media was at the chopping block if charter change is passed, said CMC dean Roland Tolentino during the press conference.

He said charter change might increase the media industry’s problems by paving the issue of foreign ownership aside from the issue of journalists killing under Arroyo’s regime.

“We can organize forums, create opinions and speak to others so we’d further be enlightened regarding this issue, and see its implications, especially in the ownership of local media,” he said.

Tolentino said that he will be focused on consulting the faculty, staff and students on creating the stand of the college.

On Thursday, Arroyo called on her allies to place HR 1109 on hold in favor of prioritizing bills that enhanced the country’s revenue.

New CMC dean to boost college programs

By Rachel Miranda

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Incoming College of Mass Communication (CMC) dean Rolando Tolentino said Thursday that he will expand the college’s offered programs in the tradition of an “independent and liberal” education amid the “growing state control of media”.

The eighth CMC dean said he will strengthen the college’s diploma and online master’s degree in journalism, and the undergraduate offerings in new media; as well as the certificate course in film, and the doctorates in both communications, and media and cultures.

“It’s time to strengthen the liberal character of our programs, that the media is liberating and our graduates are agents of liberating thought and action,” Tolentino said during the formal turnover at the CMC auditorium.

However, the Film and Audiovisual Communications professor acknowledged that CMC’s resources — such as its buildings — should be improved for these plans to take place.

“First is the upgrading of our classrooms. Second is the supporting structures of a new auditorium, a permanent canteen, tambayan, offices and library services as well as media archives and groundwork for a third and final building at the media complex,” Tolentino said.

The renovation and upgrade of the second-floor classrooms in Plaridel Hall, funded by major dailies Philippine Daily Inquirer and Philippine Star, has been ongoing since May.

Tolentino, a Philippine cinema, literature, and pop culture expert, promised to garner support from the faculty, staff and students to continue these projects.

He earned both his economics undergraduate degree and Philippine studies master’s degree at De La Salle University. Tolentino got his doctorate in film at the University of Southern California.

A member of the Congress of Teachers and Educators for Nationalism and Democracy (CONTEND-UP), Tolentino joked that there were benefits to being dean, such as a reserved parking space and a private bathroom in his office.

“I learned that there are more people I should smile at and greet while walking in the college. My friends and people who want to be my friend suddenly increased,” he added.

During the ceremony, outgoing dean Elena Pernia presented a tambuli, a native wind instrument made from carabao horns and the symbol for CMC, to Tolentino marking the beginning of his three-year term until 2011.

The event was the second turnover ceremony for the deanship in CMC. It started in 2006 when Nicanor Tiongson gave way to Pernia’s term as head of the college.

Representatives from different sectors within the college such as the faculty, administrative and Research, Extension and Professional staff, students, alumni and retired professors shared their messages for both the outgoing and incoming deans.

Also present were UP President Emerlinda Roman and other university officials.

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In Focus: Following the CMC campaign trail

Campaign season is definitely a highlight of each academic year, with students getting a taste of hot politics right at the comfort of their own colleges.

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cap2By Roehl Nino Bautista

This is one of the most colorful seasons in the university. All of a sudden, hues of red, yellow and blue — and this time, green — are worn by groups of people in semi-formal wearing big laminated name tags that scream to be remembered. Campaign season is definitely a highlight of each academic year, with students getting a taste of hot politics right at the comfort of their own colleges.

The colors, events and personalities during the campaign season are scenes that students love to remember. These shots were taken at one of the political events at the College of Mass Communication: a mudslinging event organized by Mass Communicators Organization on Feb. 20.

(Text and some photos originally published in Tinig Ng Plaridel’s 2009 Election Special.)

3 parties divide USC in election of firsts

In results from the quickest election count in UP history, Titus Tan of Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) won chairperson of the 2009 University Student Council (USC) on Feb. 25, the first time for the yellow party since it was founded in 2005.

By Andrew Jonathan Bagaoisan
Tinig ng Plaridel / UPJourn.net

In results from the quickest election count in UP history, Titus Tan of Nagkakaisang Iskolar para sa Pamantasan at Sambayanan (KAISA) won chairperson of the 2009 University Student Council (USC) on Feb. 25, the first time for the yellow party since it was founded in 2005.

The 2009 election, when all voting in UP Diliman was uniformly done and counted electronically for the first time, gave KAISA 11 seats in the 34-member council, along with Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (Stand-UP). Nine seats went to the Alyansa ng mga Mag-aaral Para sa Panlipunang Katwiran at Kaunlaran (ALYANSA), while three went to independent candidates. (see updated USC elections 2009 results)

Tan scored a more than 1,500-vote lead over Airah Cadiogan of Stand-UP, to whom he lost last year in a tight race for USC vice chair. Tan got 4,900 votes while Cadiogan won 3,389. Niña Marie Angela Acasio of ALYANSA meanwhile gained 1,276 votes.

Stand-UP’s Jaqueline Joy Eroles won USC vice chair over Joseph Miguel Gutierrez of ALYANSA with a 614-vote difference. Both are councilors in the outgoing council.

Tan, the first candidate from KAISA to win a councilor seat in 2006, is also joined in the incoming USC by three councilors from KAISA. They won the last of the 12 councilor seats and gave their party its first councilor posts since Tan first won.

An independent candidate, Christopher Mariano “Kester” Yu, meanwhile became the number one councilor after running on an environment-focused platform. In at least four years, it was also the first time an independent snagged the most votes among councilors.

Stand-UP and ALYANSA shared four councilor seats each. The other independent, Arnie “Bong” Arquiza, landed 24th place among the 35 candidates.

Tan and Yu both come from the College of Science, where they succeeded each other as college student council chairpersons.


All goes electronic

This year’s vote also put to its first large-scale test an electronic voting system that for the first time connected computers in precincts all over UP Diliman.

Students this year had a chance to vote by merely registering at the precinct, logging online with their student numbers and generated passwords, selecting their favored candidates, and confirming their votes with a mouse click.

Voter turnout this year dipped almost three points from last year, with 10,024 students or 42.96 percent of the total voting population of 23,333. The 2008 elections registered a 45.91 percent turnout.

Members of the technical team from the UP Linux Users Group (UnPLUG) stationed across the precincts to assist students and facilitate the voting.

UnPLUG developed the open-source software used for the elections, which has been used in dormitory council elections for some years and at five UP buildings in last year’s elections.

Votes cast from all colleges were monitored and counted by a central server in the Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute. After 7 p.m., the team at the server had to wait for all precincts to finish before it could close the system and start counting, members said.

All precincts finally closed around 7:30 p.m. Less than a minute after, the total results were available for viewing in each precinct.

Last year, election watchers had to hold vigil in Vinzons Hall until early morning as the results came in from each college, the larger or farther ones often near the end.

Despite technical setbacks on election morning, the election turned out “successful,” as described by Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Elizabeth Enriquez to the Philippine Collegian.

Six students in various colleges were reported by the Collegian to have voted manually. Other students’ names also did not show up in the database.

A number could not vote at once due to problems logging in. Usually these were caused by mistyping the passwords given to them, said UnPLUG members. For instance, the students often mistake the small letter L for the number 1.

UnPLUG told TNP/UPJourn.net it hopes to release the breakdown of votes this week.

CMC SC ’09 in gridlock

The two competing parties at the College of Mass Communication will share seats in the next academic year’s student council, seven to six, in favor of the college chapter of the Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (Stand-UP).

By Andrew Jonathan Bagaoisan and Mark Anthony Gubagaras
Tinig ng Plaridel / UPJourn.net

CMC Student Council, AY 2009-2010
CMC Student Council, AY 2009-2010

The two competing parties at the College of Mass Communication will share seats in the next academic year’s student council, seven to six, in favor of the college chapter of the Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP (Stand-UP).

While rival party Interdependent Student-centered Activism (ISA) got the CMC representative to the USC post, top seats at the council went to Stand-UP.

CMC students elected incumbent council vice chair Rupert Francis Mangilit of Stand-UP as the new chair and his running mate Paula Bianca Lim as vice chair. Candidate Jihad Karlo Mariano won as council secretary.

ISA’s Jo Javan Cerda won as CMC representative to the USC, and Michelle Miranda as the new council treasurer.

The eight seats for department representatives were equally shared by the two parties. Representative bets of Stand-UP both won in the Journalism department, while ISA bagged both seats for Film Institute representatives.

The parties shared one representative each for the Broadcast Communication and Communication Research departments.

Stand-UP held the majority last year with eight seats, including the top posts from college representative to treasurer. Outgoing council chair Marian Kris Santos ran this year for USC councilor under Stand-UP but eventually lost.

The last time the CMC-SC had a similar party division was in 2007, when ISA first ran in the elections. ISA then held the top posts in the council with college representative Anne Kathleen Malolos and chair Karol Mark Yee.

Voter turnout this year was 57.22 percent, which edged last year’s 56.88 percent and 2007’s 55.96 percent. Data from the College Student Electoral Board showed 655 students voted out of the 1,144 population, with more than half of the voters coming from the Journalism and Broadcast Communication departments.

College of Mass Communication Student Council winners

CMC Representative to the USC:
Jo Javan Cerda, BA Journalism (ISA)
Chairperson:
Rupert Francis Mangilit, BA Journalism (Stand-UP)
Vice Chairperson:
Paula Bianca Lim, BA Broadcast Communication (Stand-UP)
Secretary:
Jihad Karlo Mariano, BA Communication Research (Stand-UP)
Treasurer:
Michelle Miranda, BA Communication Research (ISA)
Broadcast Communication Representatives:
Micaela Faeska Salonga (ISA)
Athena Keziah Chavez (Stand-UP)
Communication Research Representatives:
Claire Pantoja (ISA)
Michelin San Diego (Stand-UP)
Film Institute Representatives:
Grace Simbulan (ISA)
Thesa Tang (ISA)
Journalism Representatives:
Kelvin Paulino (Stand-UP)
Judy Ann Espiritu (Stand-UP)

Updated Feb 27 to correct last year’s turnout to 56.88%, not 55.96% -Ed

CMC-SC Election Results

Chairperson: Rupert Francis Mangilit

Vice Chairperson: Paula Bianca Lim

Secretary: Jihad Mariano

Treasurer: Mish Miranda

BC Rep: Michaela Faeska Salonga,Athena Keziah Chavez

Journ Rep:  Kelvin Paulino, Judy Ann Espiritu

Comm Res Rep: Claire Pantoja, Michelin San Diego

Film and AVC Rep: Grace Simbulan, Thesa Tang

 

CMC Rep: Jo Javan Cerda

Corrected Jovan’s misspelled name. Apologies to him. – Ed.

CMC automated voting: so far, so good, says tech supervisor

There have been no problems as of 11:45am in this second year of the implementation of completely automated voting at the College of Mass Communication (CMC) said a technical supervisor from UP Linux Users’ Group (UnPLUG), the developer of the voting software Halalan.

By Ernica de Guzman
Tinig Ng Plaridel / UPJourn.net

There have been no problems as of 11:45am in this second year of the implementation of completely automated voting at the College of Mass Communication (CMC) said a technical supervisor from UP Linux Users’ Group (UnPLUG), the developer of the voting software Halalan.

“Technically nagkaroon lang kami ng problems nung umaga regarding yung proxy kasi may iba-ibang proxy,” said Gerry Roxas, who is the technical supervisor for CMC and is also affiliated with the Diliman Network (DilNet) Helpers.

Roxas said that instructing the students to use the machines has been okay. The only hassle so far had been repetitively telling the people to use their complete student numbers without the dash (ex: 200XXXXXX) for the username instead of the UP Webmail account username.

A previous report from Philippine Collegian had stated the elections this year will require the students’ UP Webmail accounts, which are used for the Computerized Registration System (CRS).

According to Roxas, UnPLUG’s only worry is that there may be a sudden electrical failure or that the central system, found at the UP Computer Center, will go down.

Halalan was first used in the Engineering Student Council elections for school year 2007-2008. This year will be the first Diliman-wide computerized elections.