CMC parties start room-to-room campaign

Candidates contending for council seats at the College of Mass Communication (CMC) this week began their two-and-a-half-week trek to the election by introducing their party slates and plans to the classes here.

By Andrew Jonathan Bagaoisan and Roehl Nino Bautista

Tinig ng Plaridel / UPJourn.Net

 

Candidates contending for council seats at the College of Mass Communication (CMC) this week began their two-and-a-half-week trek to the election by introducing their party slates and plans to the classes here.

STAND-UP CMC Chairperson candidate Rupert Mangilit talks to the students during a room-to-room campaign. With him are USC Councilor candidates and Marian Santos

The local unit of the university-wide Student Alliance for the Advancement of Democratic Rights in UP(STAND-UP) which holds the majority of seats in the incumbent CMC council, started their room-to-room lines picking up on the “Yes” turnout in last month’s student regent selection rules referendum.

 

STAND-UP candidates focused on their advocacies such as removing laboratory fees and resuming talks on the CMC organizations’ tambayans.

 

The candidates started campaigning Monday afternoon, said STAND-UP CMC chairperson candidate Rupert Mangilit. He said they would first carry their party’s university-wide lineup before stepping up their local campaign.

 

Rival party Interdependent Student-centered Activism (ISA) meanwhile promised to present all sides in consultation with the students before an ISA-led council released statements on issues.

Pins made out of colored paper and tape, like this one from ISA's CMC Chairperson candidate Jali Ferdnando, is a usual sight during campaign period.

They also laid out planned projects such as creating a student council website and starting a voter education campaign for the 2010 national elections.

 

ISA chairperson bet Jali Fernando said the campaign has been a “learning experience” for their candidates, most of whom had not run for council posts before.

 

The parties come to the classrooms in groups of five or more and ask the professor for time to campaign. For around ten to fifteen minutes they introduce their candidates, give the focus of their campaign,and answer any questions before they introduce their slate again and leave. University candidates also joined STAND-UP’s room-to-room rounds.

 

The parties have also set up their campaign booths on opposite ends of the CMC Skywalk, which connects the college’s two main buildings.

 

ISA has distributed its yellow-leafed general plans of action and put up posters for its candidates in two boards in the two CMC buildings only designated for posting campaign materials.

 

STAND-UP CMC has only posted materials for its university-wide standard bearers Airah Cadiogan and Jaqueline Joy Eroles. Mangilit said the party hopes to release its plans of action and campaign materials by Friday. They will have to consult their plans with CMC students before releasing them, he said.

 

With a report from Cherrie Ongteco

Author: TNP

The Official Student Publication of the UP College of Mass Communication.